Health Library

  • Oral Cancer: Newly Diagnosed

    Being told you have oral cancer can be scary, and you may have many questions. But you have people on your healthcare team to help.

  • Oral Cancer: Radiation Therapy

    Radiation therapy is a treatment for cancer that uses high-energy X-rays. A machine directs the rays of energy to the area of cancer. Radiation therapy is also called radiotherapy. Its goal is to kill or shrink cancer cells.

  • Oral Cancer: Stages

    The stage of a cancer is how much and how far the cancer has spread in your body. The stage of a cancer is one of the most important things to know when deciding how to treat the cancer.

  • Oral Cancer: Symptoms

    Know the signs of oral cancer. You can check your mouth for early signs of oral cancer. All you need to do is look at your mouth in a mirror.

  • Oral Cancer: Tests After Diagnosis

    Tests after a diagnosis of oral cancer can help your healthcare provider learn more about your cancer to help decide the best treatment.

  • Oral Cancer: Treatment Questions

    These questions can help you communicate with your doctor and know what to expect for your treatment.

  • Oral Cancer: Your Chances for Recovery (Prognosis)

    Prognosis is the word your healthcare team may use to describe your chances of recovering from cancer. Or it may mean your likely outcome from cancer and cancer treatment. A prognosis is a calculated guess. It’s a question many people have when they learn they have cancer.

  • Abuse of Prescription ADHD Medicines Rising on College Campuses

    Around the country, more and more college students are abusing stimulants to help them study. Here’s how to spot the signs of medicine use and keep your student safe.

  • Allergy Medicines: Over-the-Counter

    Your healthcare provider may recommend over-the-counter medicines, prescription medicines, or both. Medicines are most effective if you use them exactly as your healthcare provider tells you.

  • Anemia Overview

    Anemia is a common blood disorder. It occurs when you have fewer red blood cells than normal, or not enough hemoglobin in your blood. When you have anemia, your blood can’t carry enough oxygen to your body. Without enough oxygen, your body can’t work as well as it should.

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